Here’s why Justin Trudeau is as blind to Communist China as his father

Here’s why Justin Trudeau is as blind to Communist China as his father

Justin Trudeau’s recent reaction to his denial of Chinese election meddling has come as a shock. This is not the first time China has raised controversy. In 2013, he expressed his “appreciation” because “their authoritarian rule allows them to transform their economy in the blink of an eye”!

Alexandre Trudeau, his brother, wrote a book A Barbarian in New China. The contented pamphlet is a reference to a work written by her father, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, and Jacques Hebert. Two Innocents in Red ChinaFirst published in 1961, then in 2007 with a foreword by Alexander.

During the 'Great Leap Forward' in 1958, workers spent the night on a steel production site.

Photo taken from Wikimedia Commons

During the ‘Great Leap Forward’ in 1958, workers spent the night on a steel production site.

Celebrating Mao’s victory

In the fall of 1960, invited by the government, the innocent duo traveled to China. Trudeau is in Beijing on October 1. In Tiananmen Square, he attends the anniversary of the Communist victory in the Civil War, which gave birth to one of the worst dictatorships in history, an event comparable to that of the Soviet Union or Hitler’s Germany. Trudeau joins the crowd and celebrates until the next day. Then he meets Mao, who, according to him and Hebert, reveals a certain wisdom.

Mao in 1959

Photo taken from Wikimedia Commons

Mao in 1959

“Yellow peril, you speak”, they write to mock, an irrational fear, a phobia, to put it in today’s terms. China will indeed be a model of development. In addition, it helps poor countries in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Both intellectuals think that defending Taiwan against this progressive China is not really worth it.

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The journey takes place during the worst famine in history, the “Great Leap Forward”, hailed by the two innocents. To produce more steel and industrialize his country, Mao evicted millions of peasants from their ancestral lands.

Trudeau with his wife Margaret in China in 1973.  Margaret is 7 months pregnant with her son Alexander.

Photo from bc.ca, Peter Bregg/The Canadian Press

Trudeau with his wife Margaret in China in 1973. Margaret is 7 months pregnant with her son Alexander.

After replacing their name with a number, the Communists put them in newly formed labor camps. This modern slavery increased the production of steel, which was unusable. It caused a dramatic drop in agricultural production and the death of 38 million people, according to Jung Tsang and John Halliday, author of the masterful biography “The Great Helmsman.”

Mao Zedong with Stalin in 1949.

Photo taken from Wikimedia Commons

Mao Zedong with Stalin in 1949.

They attack Trudeau, one of Mao’s useful idiots, like Jean-Paul Sartre or Simone de Beauvoir. These intellectuals played into Maoist propaganda.

By this time, there were thousands of refugees in the British colony of Hong Kong, who had already witnessed the horrors of the “Great Leap Forward”.

Trudeau with Mao in 1973.

Photo from Ledevoir.com/Presse canadienne

Trudeau with Mao in 1973.

Cultural Revolution

Unhappy with the trip, Trudeau did it again in 1973 when he was in power. At this time, China was in the midst of a “Cultural Revolution,” a purge led by Mao’s fanatical militia, the “Red Guards.” Remnants of “bourgeois culture” are destroyed, books are burned, teachers are arrested and hanged, schools are destroyed. Millions of people died and Trudeau, as Prime Minister, knew about it. During his meeting with Mao, he did not let any word of this situation slip to his Chinese vis-a-vis. Would you be surprised to know that he once said that Stalin’s Soviet Union was headed in the right direction?

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His complacency with communism was evident throughout his life. At the same time, he has always presented his political commitment in terms of protecting rights and freedoms.

Red Guards in Shanghai in 1967.

Photo taken from Wikimedia Commons

Red Guards in Shanghai in 1967.

It is in this sense that he registers his struggle against Duplessis, a worse man than Mao for Trudeau.

From 1977, he attacked Bill 101, which he said violated Anglo-Quebec rights. In 1988, Bill 101 was invalidated by the charter he imposed on us. When Robert Bourassa used the clause to defend it, Trudeau accused him of violating his rights. He took advantage of his publishing opportunity Fatwa Against the Meech Lake Treaty.

Pierre Trudeau and Jacques Hebert in China in 1960.

Photo from huffingtonpost.com, Canadian Press, Montreal Gazette

Pierre Trudeau and Jacques Hebert in China in 1960.

The unique social clause would allow Quebec to violate more fundamental freedoms.

Trudeau spent his entire life disparaging Quebec. At the same time, he made a deal with a dictator guilty of crimes against humanity!

Today, by juxtaposing Justin Trudeau’s speech on Act 21 and his approach to China, we see a parallel to his father.

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