September 23, 2021

La Ronge Northerner

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CO2 readers in schools are unlikely to be installed in a timely manner at the beginning of the school year

(Montreal) The Liberal opposition believes “this is negligence, it makes no sense” and is angry to know that this is not possible for CO readers2 Contrary to what Quebec has mentioned in recent months, it should be established in all schools in the province at the beginning of the school year.




Jessica Bublot
Canadian Press

Three weeks before classes begin, Liberal education spokeswoman Marwa Risky sees only one explanation: Education Minister Jean-Franசois Roberz is “formally late.”

“He did not fully appreciate the scale and urgency of dealing with air exchange. He did not understand or want to understand how the virus is spread by aerosols. He was with us for almost a year.”

The “Plan for the Beginning of the 2021 School Year” plan, published on Prime Minister Fran பிரான்ois Legault’s Facebook page on June 2, confirms the “CO detectors”.2 In all classes. ”

The Ministry of Education pointed out last month that extensive action will be taken this fall and the Quebec government site indicates that the devices will now be installed in the “2021-2022 school year”.

The call for tenders started on July 16, when the minister announced on May 27 that it would start two weeks later. It will be withdrawn on August 16, according to information sent by email following the ministry’s request for information, and it will take a few days to install.

When asked about the exact date the devices were installed, Esther Cinnard, a spokeswoman for the minister’s office, simply replied: [suivait] Its trend for now ”

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The minister’s lack of “interest” in the Quebec project is “disappointing”, which he says is not surprising.

“The minister dragged this file for a long time,” spokeswoman Christine Labrie said. It took him months and months to realize the need to install CO readers.2 So he seemed to be moving backwards in this file. Apparently, he had to make up his mind to announce that they would install some, but he was not in a hurry to start the tender. ”

“We look at the long-term improvement of the Minister of Education,” said PQ member Veronica Hivon. This is very serious. This is very serious because we talk about both the health and safety of children in schools. But also the structure of their daily school life in the coming year. ”

We must “implement,” the unions insist

Sylvain Mallet, president of the Autonomous Education Federation (FAE), is surprised that the call for tenders was “drafted too late” a month after the announcement from Quebec.

Is it possible to equip schools with CO sensors?2 By September as initially planned? Without answering the question directly, Mr. Mallet insisted that “the government must act.”

Establishment of carbon dioxide (CO2) To measure air quality and therefore control the risk of spreading COV-19 in schools because many schools do not have adequate ventilation system, he stressed.

The absence of detectors creates uncertainty in schools, said Eric Zingross, president of the Central Des Unions (CSQ), which represents 110,000 employees of the school network.

“It is not uncommon for school staff to find out whether they are working under conditions that meet minimum air quality,” he told the Canadian Press.

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Mr Jingras said during a meeting with the Minister of Education last week that he had called for “greater stability in the implementation of health measures.”

The Ministry of Education, which was called to respond to comments from the FAE and CSQ, said by telephone on Tuesday that “schools with natural ventilation and high levels of CO2 Priority will be given as part of this process.

According to an invitation sent out Tuesday afternoon, “experts and the Minister of Education will take up the issue of air quality in schools” on Wednesday morning in Montreal.

This article was produced with the financial support of Facebook and The Canadian Press News Scholarships.